Eric Merola – IMDB Biography

Eric Merola is an internationally award-winning documentary film director.

Before starting his career in documentary films, Eric began as a motions graphics designer and animator after founding “Merola Productions” and was commissioned by various clients including Fuel TV, WE Network, The Speed Channel, and Rolling Stone’s Matt Taibbi. He was also employed as an animation director for FlickerLab in New York City, where he worked on projects for Comedy Central and A&E.

In 2007, while directing an animated sequence for Michael Moore’s feature documentary, “Capitalism: A Love Story“, Eric began production on his first documentary, “Burzynski”, which garnered widespread distribution and won numerous international awards including “Best Documentary of 2011” on The Documentary Channel, two “Audience Awards” at the HumanDoc Film Festival in Warsaw and the “Humanitarian Vision Award” at the Newport Beach Film Festival. This film also received favorable reviews from various press including The Los Angeles Times and Variety, and granted Mr. Merola a guest appearance on The Dr. Oz Show.

Eric has since released a sequel to “Burzynski” in 2013 (“Burzynski: Cancer Is Serious Business, Part II“), which garnered even larger world-wide distribution, and took home the top Audience Award for Best Documentary at the Sedona Film Festival on March 2, 2014. While working on this sequel, he was also shooting and directing his third documentary, “Second Opinion: Laetrile At Sloan-Kettering“, which will have a theatrical release starting in eight major USA cities in the summer of 2014.

Visit Eric Merola Biography page on IMDB here. 

<blockquote class=”twitter-tweet” lang=”en”><p>Congratulations to Eric Merola, director of <a href=”https://twitter.com/hashtag/Burzynski?src=hash”>#Burzynski</a&gt; <a href=”https://twitter.com/hashtag/Cancer?src=hash”>#Cancer</a&gt; is Serious Business for winning the Audience Award from BEST of <a href=”https://twitter.com/DOC_Channel”>@DOC_Channel</a&gt;!</p>&mdash; Documentary Channel (@DOC_Channel) <a href=”https://twitter.com/DOC_Channel/statuses/156420405211561984″>January 9, 2012</a></blockquote>
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New York Times – About Eric Merola

Eric Merola, Director & Producer – Bio (New York Times)

Eric Merola is an internationally award-winning documentary film director.

Before starting his career in documentary films, Eric began as a motions graphics designer and animator after founding Merola Productions and was commissioned by various clients including Fuel TV, WE Network, The Speed Channel, and Rolling Stone’s Matt Taibbi. He was also employed as an animation director for FlickerLab in New York City, where he worked on projects for Comedy Central and A&E.

In 2007, while directing an animated sequence for Michael Moore’s feature documentary, “Capitalism: A Love Story”, Eric began production on his first documentary, BURZYNSKI, which garnered widespread distribution and won numerous international awards including “Best Documentary of 2011” on The Documentary Channel, two “Audience Awards” at the HumanDoc Film Festival in Warsaw and the “Humanitarian Vision Award” at the Newport Beach Film Festival. This film also received favorable reviews from various press including The Los Angeles Times and Variety, and granted Mr. Merola a guest appearance on The Dr. Oz Show.

Eric has since released a sequel to BURZYNSKI in 2013, which also garnered world-wide distribution and won the top Audience Choice Award for Best Documentary at the Sedona International Film Festival on March 2, 2014. While working on this sequel, he was also shooting and directing his third documentary, SECOND OPINION: LAETRILE AT SLOAN-KETTERING.

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Eric Merola’s company website and bio: http://merolaproductions.com/eric-merola-bio/

Eric’s main website: http://ericmerola.com/

Eric Merola bio on Second Opinion: http://www.secondopinionfilm.com/eric-merola-director-biography

Eric Merola | 2014: March 31 Radio interview PRN.FM

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In Episode 6 of “The Infectious Myth” David Crowe interviews Eric Merola, director of three documentaries on people going outside the mainstream on cancer. The first two documentaries are Burzynski, the Movie (2010) and Burzynski: Cancer is Serious Business, Part II (2013), both on Dr. Buzynski of Houston, who has battled for decades with the US FDA to get his non-toxic antineoplastons accepted as a legal cancer therapy. The most recent film, Second Opinion (2014), is about the discovery of Ralph Moss, then in Public Relations at Sloan Kettering Memorial Cancer Centre, that Laetrile was effective in cancer treatment, and that he was supposed to be putting our press releases containing lies.

David and Eric talk about how the highly profitable nature of mainstream cancer therapy distorts the purpose of cancer treatment from helping victims of cancer, to maintaining the profitable status quo. Eric implies that the cancer establishment will have to crumble before major changes in what is allowed for cancer treatment will change in any substantial way in the United States. And that will only occur with a grass-roots revolt against the continuing War on Cancer. This decades only titanic struggle pits toxic treatments against tumors with the cancer patient’s body as the battlefield. Even if the patient doesn’t die in the process of all out war, they may wonder if it was worth it at the end.

Dr. Burzynski’s antineoplastons are natural proteins that he found were present in lower quantities in many cancer patients. He does not claim a perfect success rate, but his successes in previously intractable cases, such as many brain tumors, are vastly greater than the mainstream. Similarly, laetrile is no magic bullet, but it has been scientifically show to have some benefits. Which is more, Merola points out, that can be said for mainstream cancer treatments, which are lightly studied for one type of cancer before approval, and then widely used “off label” after approval.

David describes the current cancer treatment system as a tumor with only one aim – to maintain it’s own viability. Like all tumors, it is vulnerable to a change in the environment. And this is where all individuals who educate themselves become antineoplastons (anti-cancer-agents).

For more information on how you can watch Merola’s documentaries, see http://ericmerola.com